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Séminaire

First Nobel Physics Prize to Climate Science: Who Got It and Why It Matters

Michael Ghil & Hervé Le Treut 

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has decided to award the Nobel Prize in Physics 2021 “for groundbreaking contributions to our understanding of complex physical systems”.

        ENS, salle Froidevaux-E314- 24, rue Lhomond Paris 5e

Date début 26/10/2021 11:00
Date fin 26/10/2021
Organisateur

Description

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has decided to award the Nobel Prize in Physics 2021 “for groundbreaking contributions to our understanding of complex physical systems” with one half jointly to
Syukuro Manabe, Princeton University, USA and Klaus Hasselmann, Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany “for the physical modelling of Earth’s climate, quantifying variability and reliably
predicting global warming” and the other half to Giorgio Parisi, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy “for the discovery of the interplay of disorder and fluctuations in physical systems from atomic to planetary scales.”

Michael Ghil and Hervé Le Treut shall summarize highlights from the work of Klaus Hasselmann and Syukuro Manabe. More importantly, we shall try to give a better idea of the importance of this prize for the climate sciences: how they are practiced and how they communicate with other sciences, physical, biological and socio-economic.

Informations supplémentaires

Le séminaire ne sera a priori par rediffusé en visio, mais un enregistrement sera peut-être disponible ultérieurement.